What’s going on with the male medicine ministry in Australia?

Posted February 02, 2019 11:18:08Male medicine minister Andrew Hastie has said he is considering whether to appoint a female doctor to lead the ministry, as female doctors have faced difficulties with their roles in the past.In a wide-ranging interview with The Australian on Sunday, Mr Hastie said the appointment was not “immediately in the cards”.“It’s…

Published by admin inJune 17, 2021
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Posted February 02, 2019 11:18:08Male medicine minister Andrew Hastie has said he is considering whether to appoint a female doctor to lead the ministry, as female doctors have faced difficulties with their roles in the past.

In a wide-ranging interview with The Australian on Sunday, Mr Hastie said the appointment was not “immediately in the cards”.

“It’s not something that’s in the realm of consideration right now,” he said.

“It could be something we look at in the future.”

I’m certainly open to hearing suggestions and suggestions from all parts of the medical community, especially if we have a female person who’s qualified to do the job.

“Mr Hastie made the comments after he announced that the ministry was to be led by a female medical officer.

The male medicine minister said he did not know if the appointment would be for another five years.”

We’re not saying we won’t look at it, we’re not looking at it at the moment, but I think we have to be cautious about looking at things at the end of a five-year period,” he told ABC radio on Sunday.

Mr Hastier said the decision would be “not something that we’re necessarily looking at in terms of whether it’s a good fit”.”

We don’t want to get too far ahead of ourselves at this stage, but it certainly has been discussed,” he added.

In 2017, Dr Jennifer Tuck, who led the male medical unit at the University of Sydney, resigned after a dispute over the number of male doctors.

Dr Tuck was the first woman to hold the position of medical officer at the university, and was among a number of prominent female medical professionals to leave over the course of the year.

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