How ‘Male’ Tattoos Can Help Men Get Their Leucorhoea Back

A male leucorrhea tattoo can help men get their leucorectomy back, according to new research by researchers at Stanford University.The findings, which appeared this week in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, could also help to alleviate some of the pain and discomfort men may experience from having a bone-marrow transplant.The team, led by…

Published by admin inJuly 23, 2021
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A male leucorrhea tattoo can help men get their leucorectomy back, according to new research by researchers at Stanford University.

The findings, which appeared this week in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, could also help to alleviate some of the pain and discomfort men may experience from having a bone-marrow transplant.

The team, led by Dr. John R. Leakey, studied the healing response of 100 male patients who had undergone bone marrow transplants and had been treated with bone marrow-derived stem cells.

The study found that the men had improved their healing responses to the transplant in several ways.

For instance, the men who had the male leukocyte antigen (MLA) in their blood had a higher rate of a bone marrow response to the transplanted stem cells compared to those who had no MLA in their lymphatic system.

The same was true for bone marrow cells derived from the donated bone marrow.

And in addition to improving the response to stem cells, the marrow-based stem cells were able to boost the bone marrow’s ability to recover from damage and heal the injured bone.

“We know that there are benefits to the use of stem cells in bone marrow transplantation,” Leakeys research team explained in a statement.

“In this study, we investigated whether stem cells derived by transplantation might improve the healing and healing response to bone marrow stem cells.”

Dr. David B. Cramer, a physician at the Stanford Bone and Joint Center, said in a press release that the findings “could have a wide-ranging clinical and public health impact” because it suggests stem cells might be a valuable adjunct to bone-maiming surgeries.

Dr. Stephen B. Shuster, an associate professor of dermatology at the University of Minnesota, said the findings also could help stem cells develop in a way that makes them suitable for bone-specific bone grafts.

“It’s important to recognize that stem cells are a good source of stem cell-derived cell lines, because they can be useful in treating bone diseases,” Shuster said.

“It’s possible that a lot of these stem cell lines have the potential to be useful for bone transplants.”

Dr Leakeyds team also noted that the stem cells produced in the study could be used in other ways to regenerate healthy bone, as well.

The results could also potentially help to treat some of those men who may have experienced bone-tearing after their bone marrow was transplanted, Leakeyns team said.

“The results of our study indicate that stem cell transplants can improve bone-damaged patients’ bone marrow function and may be an effective alternative to bone transplanted bone marrow in some cases,” Leakys research group said.

For more on leucOR, visit the Stanford University news center.